The OF Blog: Humpday Book Porn

Wednesday, April 08, 2009

Humpday Book Porn



Five purchases and four review copies so far this week, leading me to decide to post these nine now rather than posting pictures of just their spines if I were to receive more tomorrow through Saturday. Besides, there are a few nice covers, no?

Left: Michael Moorcock, Mother London (continuing my Moorcock book acquisition here. This 1980s novel seems promising, so I hope to get around to reading it in the next few weeks); Alison Sinclair, Darkborn (Sinclair's first fantasy novel and one that purportedly plays off of the light/dark division found in much of fantasy literature. Might give this a try in the near future, time permitting of course).




Left: David Foster Wallace, This is Water (this is the book form of his famous 2005 commencement speech given at Kenyon College. Read this one already and will write a longer review in a day or two. But this is one of THOSE books, the ones you push upon all your friends. Can you tell that I liked it quite a bit?); Dino Buzzati, Il deserto dei Tartari (Buzzati is one of the most famous Italian authors of the 20th century and although I've enjoyed his short stories in both Italian and in English translation, this is the first time I've attempted to read one of his novels. Will be receiving the English translation in a day or two to help make sure I get this in full, but I'm currently two chapters in and the story is already gripping. Might put this book up in the next Poll, likely tomorrow night); C.C. Finlay, The Patriot Witch (fortuitous timing here, as I'm about to wrap up an interview with Finlay for another site, and now I can read this in my preferred format, the dead paper book. Looking forward to this alt-American History-with-magic tale).




Left: Lyn Benedict, Sins & Shadows (like many of the MMPBs that I receive, this is part of an ongoing urban fantasy series. Since I don't have volume one, don't know if/when I'll ever get around to reading this); Lisa Shearin, The Trouble with Demons (see what I just said about the Benedict).




Left: Neil Gaiman, The Sandman: The Wake (read this last night. Fitting close to one of the best series of stories that I have read in quite some time. Might write a review of the series in the near future, as I will have this as one of the options for the next reviewing Poll); Neil Gaiman and Yoshitaka Amano, The Sandman: Dreamhunters (collaborative effort that touches upon Japanese storytelling motifs. Will be reading this book tonight and might comment further in the near future).

3 comments:

acrisalves said...

Il deserto dei Tartari is nice, but I prefer Il segreto del Bosco Vecchio !

Ana said...

The Wake is extraordinary isn't it?

To this date The Sandman remain my favorite series of all time - I consider it to be one of the most complete works of art: it mixes literature with paintwork and it has shout outs to theatre, cinema, psychology, all sorts of mythology. It manages to be an incredible new world, with a clear plot from the start and one of the most amazing character arcs Ihave ever read. When I got to the end, I was dismayed at how everything fitted and how there could have been no other end.

Yeah, I am a fan. ; D

In case you are interested, I wrote a post about it here:

http://thebooksmugglers.com/2008/06/gaiman-week-sandman-introduction.html

Larry said...

Acrisalves,

Haven't read that one yet, but soon, perhaps.

Ana,

Yes, yes it is. The entire series as a whole is, once the end is reached and the beginning and middle have taken on new meanings.

I'll read your post in a little bit, as I'm about to cook dinner and I've been mostly away from my keyboard this weekend doing a combination of exercising and attending religious services.

 
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